contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right.

           

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

Blog

Kitchen shades

Maggie

When we moved into the apartment there were beige microfiber roman shades in the kitchen. I don't have a 'before' picture because they were so gross that they were the first thing to come down and be stashed in the basement. Since then we have had bare windows... not the best option for our single-pane heat-losing windows. I considered bamboo shades and wooden blinds before deciding we needed some color in the kitchen and that would best be achieved with fabric shade. Problem is, most window treatments with any ounce of style cost a pretty penny.

Not these puppies:

Thanks to a tutorial from fab blog Little Green Notebook, and paired with some mini-blinds ($9) and fabric ($7 per yard), I made two window shades for much less than it would cost to buy them. Yep, I said mini-blinds. They are used as a structure for the fabric and by leaving the pull strings in-tact, you can use the original hardware for a functioning roman shade.

We chose red because of the fantastic red chandelier that was here when we moved in. I love how the curtains bring more attention to the chandelier now.

Our kitchen table is where we eat breakfast and listen to music on the iPod dock. And I'm dreaming of a wall filled with vintage cutting boards between the two windows.

This was a fairly simple project, but it did take two people for some of the measuring (Ryan held things in place so the tape measure didn't pull it all over the place). I'm very happy with how they turned out. They still let a little light through but add a little barrier against the cold weather outside.

What do you think? Would you consider tackling a project like this? Questions on technique or supplies? Hit me up in the comments section!